Feline Radiographic Positioning Guide

Feline 101 – 104 Intraoral Bisecting Angle Technique

106 – 109 Extra Oral bisecting Angle Technique

Maximal and submaximal mouth opening with mouth gags in cats: implications for maxillary artery blood flow.

Martin-Flores M, Scrivani PV, Loew E, Gleed CA, Ludders JW.

Abstract

The use of spring-loaded mouth gags in cats can be associated with the development of central neurological deficits, including blindness. In this species, the maxillary arteries are the main source of blood supply to the retinae and brain. Spring-loaded gags generate constant force after placement that could contribute to bulging of the soft tissues between the mandible and the tympanic bulla. Under these circumstances, the maxillary arteries can become compressed as they course between these osseous structures. Smaller gags that might apply less force to the mouth were investigated to determine if they preserved maxillary artery blood flow. Six healthy adult cats were anesthetized. Electroretinography (ERG) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) were performed without the use of a mouth gag and during submaximal (plastic mouth gags of 20, 30 and 42 mm in length between canine teeth) and maximal mouth opening. Maximal mouth opening produced alterations in ERG waveforms consistent with circulatory compromise in 1/6 cats and reductions in signal intensity during MRA in 4/6 cats. Placement of a 42 mm plastic gag produced a reduction in MRA signal in 1/6 cats. No changes were observed with smaller gags. The force applied against the mouth was significantly higher with the spring-loaded gag than with any other gags. The use of a smaller mouth gags was associated with fewer alterations of indicators of maxillary artery blood flow. Nevertheless, a 42 mm plastic gag, equivalent to the size of a needle cap, resulted in an abnormal MRA in one cat.

Vet J. 2013 Jun;196(3):325-31

Evaluation of maxillary arterial blood flow in anesthetized cats with the mouth closed and open.

Barton-Lamb AL1, Martin-Flores M, Scrivani PV, Bezuidenhout AJ, Loew E, Erb HN, Ludders JW.

Abstract

The mouth-gag is a common tool used in veterinary medicine during oral and transoral procedures in cats but its use has recently been associated with the development of blindness. The goal of this study was to investigate whether maximal opening of the mouth affects maxillary artery blood flow in six anesthetized cats. To assess blood flow, the electroretinogram (ERG), brainstem auditory evoked response (BAER) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) were evaluated qualitatively with the mouth closed and open.

During dynamic computer tomography (CT) examinations, detection of contrast medium in the maxillary artery was quantified by measuring the Hounsfield units (HUs). The peak HU, time to peak and mean HU were determined. Changes ⩾10% of these parameters were considered indicative of altered blood flow. ERG and BAER were normal with the mouth closed in all cats, but was abnormal with the mouth opened maximally in two cats and one cat, respectively. During MRA, blood flow was undetected in either maxillary artery in one cat and reduced in the right maxillary artery in two cats, when the mouth was open. During CT, the peak HU decreased ⩾10% in three cats, the time to peak was ⩾10% longer in two cats, and the mean HU was ⩾10% lower in one cat when the mouth was open. No cat developed apparent blindness or deafness. Maximal opening of the mouth caused alterations in several indicators of blood flow in some individual cats.

Feline 201 – 204 Intraora Bisecting Angle Technique

 

206 – 209 Extra Oral bisecting Angle Technique

Maximal and submaximal mouth opening with mouth gags in cats: implications for maxillary artery blood flow.

Martin-Flores M, Scrivani PV, Loew E, Gleed CA, Ludders JW.

Abstract

The use of spring-loaded mouth gags in cats can be associated with the development of central neurological deficits, including blindness. In this species, the maxillary arteries are the main source of blood supply to the retinae and brain. Spring-loaded gags generate constant force after placement that could contribute to bulging of the soft tissues between the mandible and the tympanic bulla. Under these circumstances, the maxillary arteries can become compressed as they course between these osseous structures. Smaller gags that might apply less force to the mouth were investigated to determine if they preserved maxillary artery blood flow. Six healthy adult cats were anesthetized. Electroretinography (ERG) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) were performed without the use of a mouth gag and during submaximal (plastic mouth gags of 20, 30 and 42 mm in length between canine teeth) and maximal mouth opening. Maximal mouth opening produced alterations in ERG waveforms consistent with circulatory compromise in 1/6 cats and reductions in signal intensity during MRA in 4/6 cats. Placement of a 42 mm plastic gag produced a reduction in MRA signal in 1/6 cats. No changes were observed with smaller gags. The force applied against the mouth was significantly higher with the spring-loaded gag than with any other gags. The use of a smaller mouth gags was associated with fewer alterations of indicators of maxillary artery blood flow. Nevertheless, a 42 mm plastic gag, equivalent to the size of a needle cap, resulted in an abnormal MRA in one cat.

Vet J. 2013 Jun;196(3):325-31

Evaluation of maxillary arterial blood flow in anesthetized cats with the mouth closed and open.

Barton-Lamb AL1, Martin-Flores M, Scrivani PV, Bezuidenhout AJ, Loew E, Erb HN, Ludders JW.

Abstract

The mouth-gag is a common tool used in veterinary medicine during oral and transoral procedures in cats but its use has recently been associated with the development of blindness. The goal of this study was to investigate whether maximal opening of the mouth affects maxillary artery blood flow in six anesthetized cats. To assess blood flow, the electroretinogram (ERG), brainstem auditory evoked response (BAER) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) were evaluated qualitatively with the mouth closed and open.

During dynamic computer tomography (CT) examinations, detection of contrast medium in the maxillary artery was quantified by measuring the Hounsfield units (HUs). The peak HU, time to peak and mean HU were determined. Changes ⩾10% of these parameters were considered indicative of altered blood flow. ERG and BAER were normal with the mouth closed in all cats, but was abnormal with the mouth opened maximally in two cats and one cat, respectively. During MRA, blood flow was undetected in either maxillary artery in one cat and reduced in the right maxillary artery in two cats, when the mouth was open. During CT, the peak HU decreased ⩾10% in three cats, the time to peak was ⩾10% longer in two cats, and the mean HU was ⩾10% lower in one cat when the mouth was open. No cat developed apparent blindness or deafness. Maximal opening of the mouth caused alterations in several indicators of blood flow in some individual cats.

304 – 404 Intraoral bisecting angle Technique

 

307 -309 Intraoral Parallel Technique

 

407 -409 Intraoral Parallel Technique